Stories and Poems I liked in February and March

Things have been various hues of tough lately for everyone. I turned to writing and reading, so here are some short stories and poems I enjoyed these past two months, that I hope, if you go ahead and read them, you’ll enjoy too.

This time, besides the links to the pieces, I’ll add a couple of lines for each short story and also, since I have synesthesia, I’ll mention the colors in which I see each story in.

So, there you go!

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Life happens

You know how people see themselves flying in their dreams? I’ve never seen that. What I do in my dreams is run.

I either run fast, vaulting over obstacles like I weight nothing and I’ve been a traceuse for centuries, covering distances longer than all the levels of Crash Bandicoot combined, or I’m trying to run but no matter how hard I move my feet, it’s like I’m stuck in molasses and I can barely cover a meter.

This past month has been a mixture of both those feelings simultaneously, no dreaming added.

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Stories and Poems I liked in January

Last year, reading ended up being quite the struggle. I found it very difficult to keep my concentration when reading long or short form, and I hunted my interest in the stories I read with a harpoon.

So, this year, in an effort to bring my mojo back and keep myself accountable for reading more on the front of short fiction and poetry, I’m going to make one post per month of my favorite reads. While I didn’t read as many short stories as I had planned, I’m quite satisfied with the progress I made. Without further ado, here is a small list of the short stories and the poems that I liked during January.

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Stories:

“Green Tunnels” by Taimur Ahmad, in Fireside Fiction

“The Dead, In their Uncontrollable Power” by Karen Osborne, in Uncanny

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Poems:

“recursion” by M. Darush Whem, in Liminality

Mojo Lost by Allyson Shaw, in Liminality

“You and Your Tulpa by Jen Julian, in Liminality

“For Mrs. Q” by C.S.E. Cooney. in Fireside

“The city that changed hands by Maya Chhabra, in Strange Horizons

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